Native artist Shan Goshorn to exhibit Sept. 16-Oct. 24

“Steven Ross,” a black-and-white photograph by Shan Goshorn, is part of an upcoming exhibit at the Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University.

“Steven Ross,” a black-and-white photograph by Shan Goshorn, is part of an upcoming exhibit at the Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University.

Fostering Native pride and the “unlearning” of stereotypes is the focus of an upcoming exhibit by artist Shan Goshorn at the Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University.

“Reclaiming Cultural Ownership – Challenging Indian Stereotypes” will run from Thursday, Sept. 16, through Sunday, Oct. 24. A reception for the artist will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. Sept. 16 at the museum, in WCU’s Fine and Performing Arts Center. Goshorn will deliver a gallery talk at 5 p.m.

The installation exhibit includes photographs of Indian people by Goshorn and commercial and promotional objects such as clothing, toys and food containers that feature Native people and imagery.

Commercial and promotional objects featuring Native people and imagery are part of an exhibit by Shan Goshorn to show at the Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University from Thursday, Sept. 16, through Sunday, Oct. 24.

Commercial and promotional objects featuring Native people and imagery are part of an exhibit by Shan Goshorn to show at the Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University from Thursday, Sept. 16, through Sunday, Oct. 24.

“Shan has a highly unique and creative expression,” said Martin DeWitt, founding director and curator of the Fine Art Museum. “The exhibit offers a very personal and poetic statement.”

Goshorn, who also visited WCU in 2009, is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and lives in Tulsa, Okla. An artist for more than 25 years, she has exhibited work across the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Africa. Her work addresses contemporary American Indian and human rights issues, including Indian stereotypes and treaty violations. Goshorn’s work is in museum and corporate collections nationally and internationally, and in 2001 the Indian Affairs Commission of Tulsa honored her with the Moscelyne Larkin Cultural Achievement Award.

The exhibit is supported in part with funds from WCU’s Arts and Cultural Events Series. The Fine Art Museum’s hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. The museum also is open one hour before Fine and Performing Arts Center Galaxy of Stars performances and selected Saturday “Family Art Days.”

For more information, contact Denise Drury, curatorial specialist, at 828-227-3591 or ddrury@wcu.edu. Visit the museum online at fineartmuseum.wcu.edu.