Folklore society honors Fariello

March 31, 2010 | Share |
Anna Fariello has received a Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society. She’s shown here with her 2009 book, “Cherokee Basketry: From the Hands of our Elders.”

Anna Fariello has received a Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society. She’s shown here with her 2009 book, “Cherokee Basketry: From the Hands of our Elders.”

Anna Fariello, director of the Craft Revival Project at Western Carolina University, is a recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society.

“I am thrilled to have been awarded the Brown-Hudson award from the N.C. Folklore Society,” said Fariello, research associate professor in WCU’s Hunter Library. “This is a great honor for me personally.”

 The Folklore Society presents the Brown-Hudson Folklore Awards annually to individuals who contribute in special ways to the appreciation, continuation or study of North Carolina folk traditions. Fariello received her award, presented to her by Roseanna Belt, director of WCU’s Cherokee Center, during the Folklife Society’s annual meeting, held March 27 at the University of North Carolina at Asheville.

Fariello, who holds graduate degrees in fine arts and museum studies, was founding director of the Radford University Museum. At Virginia Tech, she organized a public outreach program related to the African-American Christiansburg Institute and completed a cultural inventory of rural southwestern Virginia. She has served as senior research fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Archives of American Art and later worked on the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. As a Fulbright Scholar, Fariello taught museum studies in Panama, where she also visited and photographed two Indian tribes. She continues to work with the Fulbright Commission as a peer reviewer.

Fariello arrived at WCU in 2005 and began to build the craft revival digital collection, which tells the story of Western North Carolina’s craft revival and coordinates the collections of seven archives in the region. In 2009 she published the book “Cherokee Basketry: From the Hands of our Elders,” which describes the craft’s forms, functions and methods and records the tradition’s celebrated makers. Her essay on the lexicon of studio craft is to be published in an anthology on craft and contemporary art, forthcoming from Duke University Press.

Other 2010 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award recipients were Eric Ellis, a premier bluegrass banjo player in Western North Carolina; Jerry Wolfe, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians renowned for his storytelling and knowledge of Cherokee culture; and Alice Gerrard, a longtime proponent of traditional music. The Folklore Society also recognizes the contributions of groups and organizations to the continuation and appreciation of state folklife with the Community Traditions Award.

For more information about WCU’s Craft Revival Project, go online or contact Fariello at 828-227-2499 or fariello@wcu.edu.

 


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